Panic Disorder – Mental Health – C-health

What are the causes and risk factors of panic disorder? A cause of panic disorder has not been conclusively proven, though genetics may affect your risk. Women and those in their 20s or 30s may be at higher risk, but panic disorder can happen to anyone at any age and can come out of nowhere or following a traumatic or stressful life event. How is panic disorder diagnosed? If you’re worried that you might have panic disorder, talk to your doctor about the symptoms you’ve experienced. Since feelings of panic and anxiety can accompany other conditions and illnesses, your doctor will likely perform a thorough examination to rule out other possible causes. You are more likely to be diagnosed with panic disorder if you: have recurrent, sudden panic attacks worry about having more attacks and what will happen if you do change your behaviour and habits because of panic attacks How can panic disorder be treated? Your treatment goal for panic disorder should be to function better on a daily basis and reduce the occurrence of your symptoms. A treatment plan for panic disorder may include cognitive-behavioural therapy, medications, or a combination of therapy and medications.
Full story: Panic disorder – Mental Health – C-Health

Opinion: Ex-CNN reporter: My struggle with panic attacks – CNN.com

A sudden fear grips you, and you begin to feel strange physical symptoms and sensations of doom and worry. Is this a panic attack? Sudden, overwhelming fear: That’s panic in a nutshell. You may have felt that kind of sudden, overwhelming fear in terrifying situations – like when you’re forced to slam on the brakes to narrowly miss a car speeding through a red light or when a large dog lunges at you with teeth bared. But a panic attack can happen at moments that have nothing to do with terror – like in the midst of a deep sleep or a dull meeting or while in a class or stuck in traffic or in line at the grocery store. And you don’t have to have a diagnosed panic disorder to experience a panic attack. Panic attacks come on suddenly and unpredictably, and often peak after about 10 to 20 minutes mark. An attack may include several or many of the following symptoms: a sudden feeling of impending doom or death a feeling like you need to escape from where you are a fear of losing control or “going crazy” a feeling of unreality or like you’re detached from yourself rapid heart rate, chest pain, or discomfort sweating, chills, or hot flashes shortness of breath tightness in your throat or trouble swallowing numbness or tingling sensations
More: Panic attack symptoms: Am I having a panic attack? – Mental Health – C-Health

Panic attack symptoms: Am I having a panic attack? – Mental Health – C-Health

Once, I was anchoring a live environment show on CNN on a weekend morning. When I started to read the headlines, I was hyperventilating and couldn’t make a sound. People at home were seeing video of what I was supposed to be talking about. I reached down, took a drink of water and told the producer I was just choking for a second. The hour show went off without a hitch from there on. I have flown nearly a million miles on Delta Airlines alone, and on nearly every flight I worried about a panic attack, and on a few of them, suffered through the full-blown thing. One time a flight attendant walked down the aisle and asked me if I needed oxygen. The sheer ridiculousness of the whole episode made me laugh and the panic passed, like it always does. What I went through is nothing compared with troops returning home from war zones struggling with PTSD, and my heart goes out to them. I am healthy, happy where I am in life, and have been blessed with great jobs and great friends.
Read more at: Opinion: Ex-CNN reporter: My struggle with panic attacks – CNN.com

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